1. Theoretical presentation

A victim of internalised racism is a person/group that personalises hatred narratives, discriminatory stereotypes, or racial prejudices which are coming at them from society without having a framework for understanding and dealing with hate speech, discrimination, or racism. We have three faces of victims:

  1. Direct victims: are those who are suffering from direct effects of internalised racism. They are those who unconsciously internalise hatred narratives, discriminatory stereotypes, or racial prejudices. They are those who are discriminated, marginalised, or racialised but consciously or unconsciously adopt a set of attitudes, behaviours, structures, and ideologies of the racial elite group. They are those who belong to a racial non-elite or a sexual and gender minority group who abandon their cultures and values to conform to the culture and values of a racial elite group or a heterosexist society.
  2. Indirect victims: are the sub-oppressors linked to direct victims in such a way that they too suffer because of that connection. These are those who belong to direct victims’ racial non-elite or a sexual and gender minority group but who explicitly gaslight direct victims or condemn attitude, behaviour, or life-style of direct victims as being shameful to their cultures and values. These are the oppressors who belong to a racial elite group or a heterosexist society who explicitly claim their superiority over a racial non-elite or a sexual and gender minority group. Indirect victims are submerged in internalised racism by displaying deep bitterness, lack of compassion and empathy. These behaviours and attitudes are often handed down; children tend to absorb and retain them consciously or unconsciously. They carry traces of these experience into their youth and adulthood, which is a problematic heritage that creates sub-oppressors, oppressors, and perpetrators.

 

A survivor of internalised racism is a person or a group who implicitly or explicitly recognises and reacts to acts of hate speech, discrimination, and racism. In our understanding, a person who at some point in their life has personalised hatred narratives, discriminatory stereotypes, or racial prejudices come at them from society but later develops or learnt who to develop a framework for both understanding and dealing with hate speech, discrimination, and racism is a survivor of internalised racism. The survivor of internalised racism chooses to accept the reality of being submerged in internalised racism and take on the fight one day at time to overcome internalised racism or/and help other victims to do so. Because internalised racism has no visible perpetrators, it is thus often difficult for the victims to take actions without being provided with the opportunities to develop interpersonal, communication, and emotional intelligence skills. Hence, the survivors of internalised racism are those who overcome the effect of internalised racism and understand that they have moral responsibility to use their experience by helping other victims to overcame internalised racism.

2. Session materials

Session activity to implement with your group of young people:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/158DyezdXgfZmkhADhpejVxL2BlD2JYPI/view?usp=sharing